Twitter Sentiment in Power BI: Who is Vancouver’s Favorite Car Share?

Voice of the Customer Series – Part 3

Who is Vancouver’s favorite car sharing company?

That’s the question I set out to answer in today’s blog post – at least according to what people are saying about them on Twitter.

In part 1 of my Voice of the Customer series, I demonstrated how you can set up an automated process to collect tweets that mention your brand using Microsoft Flow. The data could be pushed to a SQL database, Google sheet, or even a streaming Power BI dataset.

In part 2 I showed how you can calculate the sentiment score of each tweet by calling the Azure Cognitive Services API in Power BI.

This final post ties it all together in a Power BI report. Combining tweets from Car2Go, Modo, and Evo car shares, the report track tweets to each brand, and analyzes how positive or negative each tweet is. You can interact with the results below:

What did I find?

According to the tweets posted between April 28th and May 7th, Modo car share appears to be the crowd favorite. The tweets mentioning their Twitter handle had the highest average sentiment score (a measure of tweet positivity), during this period.

Car2Go also received the most one day Twitter mentions – unsurprising considering 1 in 6 Vancouverites are Car2Go members!

How can we use this report to foster an action-oriented data culture?

First of all, a report like this makes it easy for us to spot outliers – in this case, very positive or negative tweets. Customers are sharing their product experiences online, and we can now easily spot instances where customers have been let down, or had amazing experiences.

Secondly, Power BI allows us to set up data alerts (hint: future blog post). Imagine receiving an email or slack message when a customer tweets above or below a certain sentiment threshold. Customer service reps could follow up with them, possibly turning their negative experience into a positive one.

Thirdly, we can now track how sentiment is trending over time. Are customer service efforts and product redesigns helping improve how positively people are talking about our products online?

What about mobile?

There is also a mobile version of this Power BI report. You can view it in action below:

Interested in setting something like this up for your organization?

Give me a shout on Twitter. We can create a real-time dashboard like this, set up automated data alerts (email/Slack/you name it), and help your organization take action when your brand is mentioned online.

Twitter is just one example, but similar processes could be set up for Facebook/Glassdoor/Instagram.

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  1. […] my next post I’ll show how to create visualizations and create an interactive dashboard in Power BI with […]

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